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Greenwich, CT 06830
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Home Service Software

There was a song in the 1980s that shot up the charts about a hard-working blue-collar woman hustling for a paycheck. That popular Donna Summer tune about a restroom attendant was titled, “She Works Hard for the Money.” What Summer didn’t call it was, “She Works Hard Out of the Goodness of Her Heart.” If you’re a small business owner, you can undoubtedly relate to this hit song’s subject. You work hard at your craft, and you deserve payment for it. This is where things can get tricky if you don't have a solid handle on the invoice process.With so many moving parts, invoicing can be a particularly troubling function—but it doesn’t have to be. We’ve got the invoicing tips you’re looking for on what to do, what to avoid and the one thing that can make it all easier than ever before.

It seems unfathomable, but computers in the 1950s were a far cry from the slick and portable machines we depend on today. With the concept of the personal computer years away from coming to fruition, clunky mainframes (that’s what they used to call computers) occupied entire rooms in schools and large corporations [paywall]. Given the size and cost of these monstrosities, mainframe users often shared access to data through smaller stations around the office. Though no one called it by name at the time, this type of networking was laying the groundwork for what we refer to today as “cloud computing.”

When you’re a small home service business it can feel like you have the weight of the company on your shoulders. Not only performing duties that your customers require, but you also have all the backend obligations. Wearing that hat means that you must stay plugged-in to all aspects of company operations. It can be challenging to keep track of all of these moving parts. If there is one area where you simply can’t afford to make a mistake, it’s in the handling of finances. WHERK Home Service Software is helping businesses like yours control, manage, and report on their finances. Here are just a few ways showing how.

Being a business owner or a manager can be a challenge for a variety of reasons. One of the biggest is putting a plan in place to keep employees accountable. There’s a fine line between being a supportive manager and being a micromanager. Lean too far to one side, and your employees yearn for freedom and start to resent you. Lean too far to the other, and you strip them of the chance to learn and grow. With such a thin margin of error, it’s crucial that you develop a plan to keep employees accountable. Whether they’re located in the office or out in the field. We’ve put together three quick tactics to consider incorporating as part of that plan.

Plenty of situations and circumstances can strike fear in the hearts of small business owners. There’s the potential for sagging sales and the reality of having to handle multiple roles. Also, there are the complexities of managing a staff of employees. Regardless of industry, most small businesses actually reside in the people business. Which makes it even more ironic that one of the most significant sources of dread among small business owners doesn’t even involve people. It’s the fear of automation and a hesitance to trust “the cloud.”As technology has evolved and cloud-based opportunities became increasingly available, the savviest of small business owners realized that the right move is to welcome automation, not fear it. If you’re someone who still isn’t sure if automation is for you, keep reading. We’ll explain automation and the cloud, why there’s nothing to be afraid of and how automation can improve your business.

Paperwork has long been a mainstay of the business world. Documents, reports, contracts, bills, invoices, protocols. It's a never-ending list, and it all eventually turns into skyscraping stacks of files. Those files cost businesses a surprisingly steep amount of time and money to produce, store and keep track of. Businesses and their executives are becoming increasingly aware of these costs, and many are setting their sights on paperless operations. In fact, according to Device Magic, 80 percent of small-to-midsize businesses (SMBs) want to cut paper processes out of their workflows. Because they have fewer employees and less large bureaucratic structures in place, small businesses are in a unique position to embrace a paperless business model. Here are a few reasons why the paper-based processes are costing your business more than you know.

 

 

If you're a plumber, an HVAC professional, electrician, repairman, mover, painter, or a general contractor, you all have one thing in common.  Being on the move most of the day. These pros go from one job, or service request to another.  They also need to ensure they're following protocol and moving through their queues with efficiency and diligence. In the past, the only way to keep track of field-based employees was over the phone. For operations heads, this has long been a limiting and often flawed way to manage their workforce. While field workers will update you and tell you where they are, keeping track of them throughout the day can be a challenge.

Business software today does more than just automate the various recurring tasks that come with managing a workforce. These platforms can show small business owners how to better market their business. By 2023, it's projected to be worth more than $600 billion. Because the industry is always introducing new technology, it can be hard to get a firm handle on the basics. Small businesses sometimes struggle to make sense of how they fit into the complicated world of new technology.

2019 is as good a time as ever for small business owners to start getting familiar with new technology. There are more options with greater functionalities at more reasonable price points than ever before. As the competition in industries, such as HVAC, retail, and utilities, becomes more aware of how these solutions can help their businesses, the case for seriously considering them only gets stronger. Below are several frequently asked questions about business and home service software—with a focus on their value for small businesses.

Conventional wisdom often suggests that while large corporations grow more advanced, small businesses retain a more old-fashioned identity. This may be true in some cases. Small businesses often operate on local or regional levels. As a result, they don't have to win customers in a national competitive landscape. Many rivals pour millions into new technologies and cutting-edge strategies for boosting profits. Further, their own rivals sometimes aren't especially forward-thinking, either. This eases the pressure on them to pick up on the latest business trends and evolve with them.

There are many incorrect assumptions about how software might negatively impact a business. These include misconceptions around the price, lack of obvious business benefits, or worries about how hard it is to use the software. These myths are particularly prevalent among small businesses. That’s a shame because in many ways small businesses stand to benefit the most from these platforms' features. Here are a few of the biggest and most enduring myths about business software.