Contact Info
330 Railroad Ave, Floor 2
Greenwich, CT 06830
Send us a note
(203) 200 0588‬

Efficiency Tag

Life as a small business owner is one filled with peaks and valleys. There’s the rush received from an influx of new orders. The thrill of payments posting to your account. The disappointment when a customer isn’t happy and the despair when times are slow. Most realistic small business owners recognize that these experiences are not only possibilities, but each is likely to happen at some point. Yet, what so many seem to overlook or fail to prepare for are those pesky last-minute cancellations. The best way to tackle these is with an established cancellation policy.A well-written cancellation policy is like insurance for a small business in that it protects you when you’re most vulnerable. Concepting and drafting that cancellation policy template is also a lot easier than most people think. If a customer blowing you off has burned your business in the past, you’ll want to read our tips below on creating a simple but effective cancellation policy.

Cash will always be king, but credit cards are the ace for millions of Americans across the country. In fact, more than 70% of American households have at least one general credit card. Despite the credit card’s place in today’s society, the widespread popularity of “charging it” is actually a relatively new phenomenon. Retailers in the 1970s were hesitant to accept credit cards. Consumers balked at embracing them out of fear of being on the hook for unauthorized charges. But that all changed with the Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA) of 1974.This amendment to the Truth in Lending Act instilled consumer confidence.  It provided protection from unfair billing practices and identity theft. FCBA was also responsible for the creation of what we now call a “chargeback.” As a small business owner, you might have heard the term before, but you might not be sure how to handle them. Read on to learn more about what a chargeback means for your business and how to avoid them.

It seems unfathomable, but computers in the 1950s were a far cry from the slick and portable machines we depend on today. With the concept of the personal computer years away from coming to fruition, clunky mainframes (that’s what they used to call computers) occupied entire rooms in schools and large corporations [paywall]. Given the size and cost of these monstrosities, mainframe users often shared access to data through smaller stations around the office. Though no one called it by name at the time, this type of networking was laying the groundwork for what we refer to today as “cloud computing.”

In 1975, actor Roy Scheider delivered one of the most memorable lines in movie history when he said: “You’re gonna need a bigger boat.” The phrase—first uttered by Scheider’s character, Chief Martin Brody, in Jaws—has grown a life of its own in the 40+ years since audiences first heard it. Today, its meaning spans well beyond Brody’s attempt at thwarting the man-eating shark’s thirst for carnage. It’s now a euphemism for a situation where someone is ill-equipped or unprepared to handle what’s in front of them.If you own a small business and you’re feeling overworked and understaffed, let us first congratulate you. Finding that level of success isn’t easy, and many fail before encountering the problem you have.  Also, it may cause damage to the long-term health of your business if you don’t consider when it’s time to hire a bigger team.  Here are three ways to know when it’s time for that proverbial bigger boat.

Small business owners should never feel like they need to acquire business software simply for the sake of implementing the latest technology. Yes, the business software market is expanding rapidly and growing at a rate of eight percent a year. Its market share is now hundreds of billions of dollars, but that doesn't mean entrepreneurs should rush to purchase the latest platforms. Small businesses should take a careful and strategic approach to select software. They can do this by first examining their own objectives and identifying areas they want to improve on.

A plumber has a better chance of clearing a clog with a toilet auger than with a curling iron. Likewise, a hairdresser probably wouldn’t get much use out of a pipe wrench. For home service businesses, there are specific sets of tools that are unique to that line of work. Some assets span across all industries and serve a universal need. To fill a void that service businesses may encounter, here are three quick ways that WHERK Home Service Software can benefit your small business. Regardless of the industry.

Home service businesses often face the task of doing more with less. Having enough of something can always be a huge challenge. If your challenge is a shortage in the budget or having time constraints, many home service businesses are turning to software and automation. For those business owners who may not be aware of home service software, there are a number of common questions. Here, we've put together some brief answers.

We tend to think of big corporations and multinational conglomerates as the most technologically advanced companies in the business world, and they can always afford to implement the latest software systems. In recent years, the boom in products like workforce management systems (WMS), work order management systems (WOMS), customer relationship managers (CRM), and field service management (FSM) software have increased in availability and options. This means two things. For one, increased competition has driven down costs which will open the door for small and midsize businesses (SMBs) to invest. Secondly, and quite simply, the explosion of new options, including thousands of products that cover several hundred different categories. Every organization can find something that can be an excellent fit for them. Here, we take a look at some strategies that small businesses can use to make the latest software work for them.