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Insider Tips

There’s a common belief that employees leave jobs because they want more money. In our heads, we often think of these emotionally charged decisions in the way that they’re portrayed in pop culture. We picture scenes that involve the ironfisted boss rebuffing the underdog employee’s request for a modest raise. The reality is far less dramatic. In fact, only about 12% of employees leave their jobs over money, but nearly 80% exit because they don’t feel appreciated. To put it bluntly, people quit bosses, not companies. Respectful, inclusive, and collaborative working environments go a long way to improving your overall retention and employee productivity.

Being a business owner or a manager can be a challenge for a variety of reasons. One of the biggest is putting a plan in place to keep employees accountable. There’s a fine line between being a supportive manager and being a micromanager. Lean too far to one side, and your employees yearn for freedom and start to resent you. Lean too far to the other, and you strip them of the chance to learn and grow. With such a thin margin of error, it’s crucial that you develop a plan to keep employees accountable. Whether they’re located in the office or out in the field. We’ve put together three quick tactics to consider incorporating as part of that plan.

As a society, there are a few things we do more than publicize our likes and dislikes. We love to leave glowing restaurant reviews on Yelp.  Singing the praises of our favorite running shoes to friends at the gym. We vent about a car dealership mishap or rude cashiers at the grocery store on social media. And though we all seem to be talking all of the time, it turns out most of us are actually listening too. Statistics show that 83% of Americans say that word-of-mouth recommendations from a friend or family member make them more likely to buy something. That statistic is even more pronounced when you look at younger demos like Millennials. They are 115% more influenced by word-of-mouth than traditional advertising. Word-of-mouth marketing can lead to so many conversions.  Many small businesses have looked for ways to capitalize on customers’ fervent fan-hood. The most obvious method is through a referral program. With most small business tactics, there’s hardly a one-size-fits-all approach. In hopes of spurring some ideas that might work for your business, we’ve put together a list of a few of our favorite referral programs.

We all tend to throw the term “heartbroken” around with regularity. We use it to describe the end of a relationship when we lose a loved one, and even when we’re sad about our favorite team losing. However, you don’t often hear someone say they’re heartbroken over their work/life balance.—but it turns a lot of people actually are.

Basically, bosses that serve as a source of stress are literally breaking the hearts of their employees. An international study conducted by Sweden’s Karolinska Institute found a connection between leadership behavior and the prevalence of heart disease. So, as a leader, what can you do to make sure your employees are happy and productive? Here are a few quick ways to ensure your employees enjoy a healthy work/life balance and a positive company culture.

Whether you're a plumber, an HVAC professional, electrician, repairman, mover, painter, or a general contractor, you all have one thing in common: being on the move most of the day. These pros go from one job, or service request to another.  They also need to ensure they're following protocol and moving through their queues with efficiency and diligence. In the past, the only way to keep track of field-based employees was over the phone. For operations heads, this has long been a limiting and often flawed way to manage their workforce. While field workers update you and tell you where they are in the field, keeping track of them throughout the day can be a challenge.

Think about the last few purchases you made. How many of them were purely impulse buys? Where you hadn’t done any research on the manufacturer/provider, the product/service, or even spoke with someone who had? The fact is that 90% of people believe in brand recommendations from friends. Word-of-mouth marketing has never been more critical than it is today. In addition to the bump it provides in conversion rates, a huge benefit to utilizing word-of-mouth is that there’s no cost. Word-of-mouth isn’t the only cost-effective way to reach potential customers in a targeted way. The rise of social media has also given small businesses the type of publishing platform that used to come with a pretty expensive price tag.

Many businesses have peaks and valleys, but few understand the gravity of these swings like those in a seasonal market. For instance, a landscaping company in a cold climate doesn't have the same type of work lined up in late January than it does in late July. If you’ve been racking your brain for a few ways to increase awareness during your downtime, we've got some ideas to help you. Here are three ways for your business to stand out in a seasonal market.

There are many incorrect assumptions about how software might negatively impact a business. These include misconceptions around the price, lack of obvious business benefits, or worries about how hard it is to use the software. These myths are particularly prevalent among small businesses. That’s a shame because in many ways small businesses stand to benefit the most from these platforms' features. Here are a few of the biggest and most enduring myths about business software.

There’s a reason why you’re more likely to find an old “Yellow Pages” phonebook in an antique shop than someone’s home. Like rotary telephones, black and white televisions and typewriters before it, new technology basically left the printed directory in the dust. We all know most people now go online to gather information, but did you know 90% of American adults use the internet? And they’re not just searching for phone numbers either.

A plumber has a better chance of clearing a clog with a toilet auger than with a curling iron. Likewise, a hairdresser probably wouldn’t get much use out of a pipe wrench. For home service businesses, there are specific sets of tools that are unique to that line of work. Some assets span across all industries and serve a universal need. To fill a void that service businesses may encounter, here are three quick ways that WHERK Home Service Software can benefit your small business. Regardless of the industry.