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The term “melting pot” first became popularized in America more than 100 years ago.  When a play by the same name opened in Washington, D.C., on October 5, 1908. That production portrays a Russian immigrant escaping violent upheaval. It lays out the protagonist’s dream of a society free of any ethnic divide.Around the time of the 2020 U.S. Census, it’s expected that more than 50% of this country’s children will be part of a minority race or ethnic group. With Americans’ genetic makeup more varied than ever before, your staffing efforts must support and mirror that mix. But ensuring diversity is more than just a buzzword takes commitment to the cause. Here are three actionable ways that you can strengthen your strategy of retaining a diverse staff.

If you think attracting new customers is tough, try retaining the ones you have. Not only must you have enough brand cache to get them in the door, but you have to offer a quality product and a good enough experience to make them want to come back. Hit on one or two of those, and you might have a customer on your hands. Hit on all three, and you might have a customer for life. With the rampant rise in popularity of online shopping, some brick and mortar locations have found a need to constantly angle for new ways to increase traffic into the store.Given the fact that some estimates peg the cost to attract a new customer at up to seven times the cost of what it takes to retain one, the smartest brick and mortar businesses put a heavy emphasis on deepening customer loyalty. If you’re looking for new ways to jumpstart your own customer retention efforts, you’re in luck. We’ve put together a list of three of our favorite methods below.

Life as a small business owner is one filled with peaks and valleys. There’s the rush received from an influx of new orders. The thrill of payments posting to your account. The disappointment when a customer isn’t happy and the despair when times are slow. Most realistic small business owners recognize that these experiences are not only possibilities, but each is likely to happen at some point. Yet, what so many seem to overlook or fail to prepare for are those pesky last-minute cancellations. The best way to tackle these is with an established cancellation policy.A well-written cancellation policy is like insurance for a small business in that it protects you when you’re most vulnerable. Concepting and drafting that cancellation policy template is also a lot easier than most people think. If a customer blowing you off has burned your business in the past, you’ll want to read our tips below on creating a simple but effective cancellation policy.

Cash will always be king, but credit cards are the ace for millions of Americans across the country. In fact, more than 70% of American households have at least one general credit card. Despite the credit card’s place in today’s society, the widespread popularity of “charging it” is actually a relatively new phenomenon. Retailers in the 1970s were hesitant to accept credit cards. Consumers balked at embracing them out of fear of being on the hook for unauthorized charges. But that all changed with the Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA) of 1974.This amendment to the Truth in Lending Act instilled consumer confidence.  It provided protection from unfair billing practices and identity theft. FCBA was also responsible for the creation of what we now call a “chargeback.” As a small business owner, you might have heard the term before, but you might not be sure how to handle them. Read on to learn more about what a chargeback means for your business and how to avoid them.

There was a song in the 1980s that shot up the charts about a hard-working blue-collar woman hustling for a paycheck. That popular Donna Summer tune about a restroom attendant was titled, “She Works Hard for the Money.” What Summer didn’t call it was, “She Works Hard Out of the Goodness of Her Heart.” If you’re a small business owner, you can undoubtedly relate to this hit song’s subject. You work hard at your craft, and you deserve payment for it. This is where things can get tricky if you don't have a solid handle on the invoice process.With so many moving parts, invoicing can be a particularly troubling function—but it doesn’t have to be. We’ve got the invoicing tips you’re looking for on what to do, what to avoid and the one thing that can make it all easier than ever before.

There’s a common belief that employees leave jobs because they want more money. In our heads, we often think of these emotionally charged decisions in the way that they’re portrayed in pop culture. We picture scenes that involve the ironfisted boss rebuffing the underdog employee’s request for a modest raise. The reality is far less dramatic. In fact, only about 12% of employees leave their jobs over money, but nearly 80% exit because they don’t feel appreciated. To put it bluntly, people quit bosses, not companies. Respectful, inclusive, and collaborative working environments go a long way to improving your overall retention and employee productivity.

 Contrary to what some may believe, there are still effective methods of advertising your small business that don’t involve the internet. If you just let out a gasp and clutched your chest, we understand why you’d feel that way. Between display, social media, search engine marketing, remarketing, video and email, the tried-and-true approaches of yesteryear seem all but forgotten. But the truth is, tactics like direct mail can still work if done in the right way.Postcard marketing is a perfect example. In one survey conducted in the UK, 57% of respondents said that postcard marketing made them feel more valued and that a postcard created a more authentic relationship. As it turns out there’s something to be said for a tangible ad. One that you can hold and put on the fridge. If using postcards is an approach that you’re considering adding to your marketing mix, you should be aware of both the pros and cons.

The most successful small businesses are usually those that stick to well-defined processes that run like clockwork. Whether it’s over the course of bidding, product development, customer service or invoicing, developing a proven and effective flow for how, when, where and why things happen can be the difference in a company thriving and not surviving.While many leaders of small businesses recognize the value in a referral program as a lead generation source, less will realize the importance of process planning. In the same way, a lack of control can cause chaos in product development or in customer service, let's say, the same can be said about a referral program. If you really want to do it right, here are four questions to ask yourself before starting a referral program.

It seems unfathomable, but computers in the 1950s were a far cry from the slick and portable machines we depend on today. With the concept of the personal computer years away from coming to fruition, clunky mainframes (that’s what they used to call computers) occupied entire rooms in schools and large corporations [paywall]. Given the size and cost of these monstrosities, mainframe users often shared access to data through smaller stations around the office. Though no one called it by name at the time, this type of networking was laying the groundwork for what we refer to today as “cloud computing.”

When you’re a small home service business it can feel like you have the weight of the company on your shoulders. Not only performing duties that your customers require, but you also have all the backend obligations. Wearing that hat means that you must stay plugged-in to all aspects of company operations. It can be challenging to keep track of all of these moving parts. If there is one area where you simply can’t afford to make a mistake, it’s in the handling of finances. WHERK Home Service Software is helping businesses like yours control, manage, and report on their finances. Here are just a few ways showing how.